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Mobile Oil Change in Folly Beach, SC

Here's a fact that most of us can agree on: Cars are getting more advanced with each passing day. Despite the emergence of technologies like self-driving cars, motor oil remains one of the most important elements of an internal combustion vehicle's makeup. You probably heard your parents preach about changing your car's oil frequently, and they were right. If you want to take care of your car, you've got to change its oil. Luckily, many modern cars include a built-in service reminder that notifies you when an oil change is necessary.

Even though your car's onboard computer can help with reminders, it's still a good idea to check oil levels often. The problem is that in today's day and age, lots of folks don't have the time or patience to change oil themselves. Ask yourself this: When was the last time lifted the hood of your car and checked your oil? What about your air filter and windshield wipers?

Between long workdays, impromptu meetings, family obligations, and life's little surprises, changing oil by yourself can be both difficult and frustrating. You know that your oil needs to be changed, but you just don't have the bandwidth to get it done. If that sounds familiar, it might be time for a mobile oil change in Folly Beach, SC.

Mobile oil change services allow you to focus on your busy life without having to get your hands dirty or wait in line for hours at the dealership. And when it comes to mobile oil changes in Folly Beach, none do it better than On the Go Mobile Oil Change Service.

Service Areas

Drive Confidently with Help from On the Go Oil Change

When it comes to maintaining your car, you can trust our oil change experts to keep your vehicle running smoothly anywhere in Folly Beach. Our team comes to your location ASAP, whether it's a parking spot near your office or in your own driveway. Once we arrive, we will work hard and efficiently to quickly complete your mobile oil change in Folly Beach, SC.

After all, your time is valuable. That's why we come to you - so you don't have to wait in a crowded waiting room or somewhere else while we work on your car. With On the Go Oil Change, you can rest easy knowing your car or truck is in capable hands. That way, you can focus on what you need to accomplish rather than worrying about drip pans and oil filters.

Our process is easy and streamlined to make your life as easy as possible.

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Get Started
Get Started

When you're ready for mobile auto service, call us at 843-406-3466 to receive an estimate and reserve an appointment. You can also book your appointment via our website.

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Auto Service
Enjoy Quick & Easy Mobile Auto Service in Folly Beach, SC

Once you reserve your appointment time and date, we bring a wealth of auto experience directly to you. Our technicians show up on time with a smile, provide efficient and thorough auto services like oil changes, and let you go about your day.

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Automobile
Drive your Automobile with Confidence!

Once we've completed your auto services, it's time to get back on the road with confidence knowing that On the Go Mobile Oil Change took great care of you and your car.

On the Go Oil Change Services

Depending on your needs, we can help assist with a variety of mobile auto services in Folly Beach, SC, including the following:

Standard Oil Change

This package includes a full synthetic oil change and filter change.

Time: 30 Mins

Cost: $79.99

Includes 5 quarts of oil. Additional quarts are billed at $10 per quart.

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Silver

This package includes a full synthetic oil change, filter change, and windshield wiper replacement.

Time: 45 Mins

Cost: $109.99

Includes 5 quarts of oil. Additional quarts are billed at $10 per quart.

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Gold

This package includes a full synthetic oil change, filter change, air cabin filter change, and windshield wiper replacement.

Time: 45 Mins

Cost: $129.99

Includes 5 quarts of oil. Additional quarts are billed at $10 per quart.

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Platinum

This package includes a full synthetic oil change, filter change, air filter replacement, cabin filter replacement, and windshield wiper replacement.

Time: 45 Mins

Cost: $149.99

Includes 5 quarts of oil. Additional quarts are billed at $10 per quart.

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Want to learn more about mobile oil changes or the other auto services offered by On the Go Oil Change Service? Contact our office or leave us a message on our website. We'd love to hear from you!

Top 5 Signs Your Car Needs a Mobile Oil Change in Folly Beach, SC

Is your vehicle trying to tell you that it needs some attention? One of the ways it communicates with you is through signs indicating that it's time for an oil change. Ignoring these signals can lead to unwanted - and very expensive - consequences. Let's take a closer look at the most common signs that your car needs fresh oil and why neglecting this crucial task can be a costly mistake.

Is a Mobile Oil Change Really Necessary? Top Reasons to Change Your Oil Regularly

As we mentioned earlier, it's easy to put off car maintenance. If you're like most folks living in Folly Beach, you've got a busy 9-5 job and other obligations to accomplish every day. But if there's one thing you should try and keep up with, it's vehicle maintenance. And when it comes to maintenance, one of the most important areas to focus on is your engine's oil.

The oil in your engine is responsible for reducing friction and heat by lubricating moving parts. Fresh oil lubricates at its peak efficiency, which in turn minimizes the wear and tear on your engine components. Without a mobile oil change in Folly Beach, SC, your engine's cylinder bores can wear out significantly faster. While it may be hard to notice on the camshafts, over time, this increased wear can create a significant loss in power.

But that's just the start. Keep the following issues in mind next time you feel like putting off an oil change.

Overheated Engine

Oil not only lubricates engine parts but also helps in cooling them down. Even regular cars have specific designs to reduce oil temperature, while race cars have dedicated oil coolers. However, surpassing oil change intervals can lead to a reduction in oil-based cooling, causing increased friction and excessive heat. When heat levels are too high, your engine can overheat, leading to even more problems.

Debris Becomes Lodged in Mechanical Systems

Many complex mechanical systems require proper oil flow to function properly, such as variable valve timing, engine breathers, and turbochargers. Variable valve timing systems rely on the oil pressure of the engine to operate with precision.

Even a slight decrease in oil pressure, quality, or viscosity can adversely affect these systems. In the best-case scenario, the engine stops varying the valve timing properly. In the worst-case scenario, the variable valve timing system gets clogged, and it needs to be removed, replaced, or cleaned.

Loss of Performance

If you're used to skipping oil changes, you may have noticed the difference between how your car performs after having its oil changed. Fresh, new oil keeps the spinning parts of your engine running smoothly. When those parts run smoothly, your car doesn't have to use as much power to make revolutions. That, in turn, bumps up performance levels.

Voided Warranty

Did you know that the manufacturer's warranty for a new car can last up to ten years, but only if you follow the recommended maintenance schedule? If you miss too many oil changes, for example, the warranty terms could be declared void. If you ever need major repairs on your car, it could end up costing you thousands of dollars more than it would have if the warranty was still valid.

Having On the Go Mobile Oil Change service your car is one of the best ways to avoid unexpected - and more expensive - repairs.

Poor Fuel Economy

Earlier in this article, we mentioned how decreased fuel economy could be a sign that you need your oil changed. It's also a symptom of infrequent oil changes. Failing to change your engine oil on time can lead to an increase in your fuel consumption. This is primarily caused by the increase in heat, reduction in compression due to worn cylinders, and lack of cooling, which ultimately results in lower fuel efficiency.

In the long run, this increase in fuel consumption can significantly raise gas costs, which end up being more expensive than mobile auto services in Folly Beach, SC.

Failed Turbos and Destroyed Engines

Turbochargers are widely used in modern cars to increase their power and efficiency by utilizing waste energy from the exhaust. They are responsible for the popularity of small, high MPG-achieving engines found in many popular auto brands.

Turbos spin at incredibly fast speeds, exceeding 10,000 RPM, and require a substantial supply of oil to operate efficiently. Any pause or disruption in the oil supply can cause the turbine to overheat and fail. Since half of the turbo is in the path of the air entering the engine, in the event of a catastrophic failure, shards of the turbine can break off and enter the engine, resulting in severe damage.

Reduced Sale Price of Your Car

Most new car owners don't think of the resale value of their new vehicle as they're driving it off the lot. That doesn't change the fact that you may decide to sell or trade it in for a new vehicle down the road. If that happens, make sure you get your oil changed regularly.

By following a regular schedule of oil changes, you can increase the resale value of your car. This is because the engine will perform noticeably better during an inspection or test drive. It's important to keep a detailed record of all maintenance, including oil changes, as this can further improve your sale price.

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On the Go Pro Tip:

At this point, you may be wondering how many miles you should wait before having a mobile oil change. As a general rule, it's a good idea to have your oil changed every three thousand miles. However, some newer model cars only require an oil change every 7,500 miles. The bottom line is that every car is different. It's best to refer to your vehicle's owner's manual for detailed information on oil changes.

 Oil Change While At Home Folly Beach, SC

Enjoy Peace of Mind and Better Performance with a Mobile Oil Change in Folly Beach, SC

At this point, you may be wondering how many miles you should wait before having a mobile oil change. As a general rule, it's a good idea to have your oil changed every three thousand miles. However, some newer model cars only require an oil change every 7,500 miles. The bottom line is that every car is different. It's best to refer to your vehicle's owner's manual for detailed information on oil changes.

We take pride in using quality oils and filters and provide a variety of extra services, such as auto filter changes and wiper blade replacements. By keeping our mobile oil change services reasonably priced, we can help ensure they get the best possible value for their money.

Whether you need us to change your oil at your house, your office, or somewhere else, we've got you covered. If you own a business that requires company vehicles, we can even service your fleet of cars or trucks. Contact our office today to schedule your mobile oil change or to learn more about our mobile auto services in Folly Beach.

Mobile Oil Change Folly Beach, SC

Latest News in Folly Beach, SC

13 Things To Do In Folly Beach, South Carolina

It's only twelve miles south of Charleston's historic homes and manicured window boxes, but the salty little town of Folly Beach ditches the Holy City's refinement in favor of an easygoing, barefoot sensibility that feels a bit more California than Carolina. Known to locals as the Edge of America, Folly is everything a ...

It's only twelve miles south of Charleston's historic homes and manicured window boxes, but the salty little town of Folly Beach ditches the Holy City's refinement in favor of an easygoing, barefoot sensibility that feels a bit more California than Carolina. Known to locals as the Edge of America, Folly is everything a beach town should be. Surf shops line the main drag; cover-ups count as appropriate lunch attire; and nobody takes themselves too seriously (they drop a pair of LED-lit flip-flops to celebrate New Year's Eve). Here's where to stay, eat, relax, and play in South Carolina's super chill surf town.

Where to Stay

For a feels-like-home experience coupled with the charm and convenience of a boutique hotel (complimentary breakfast and happy hour daily, plus a free shuttle to the beach), book The Regatta Inn. Its best amenity of all, though, is the view: a spectacular vantage of Folly River and the surrounding marshland.

Every single room at Tides Folly Beach comes with an ocean view. Perched at the end of Center Street, the town's main thoroughfare, the hotel is steps from both the beach and an array of local shops and eateries.

For families looking to stretch out a bit more, there are a boatload of rentals to choose from: Opt for ocean-front properties that will sleep a crowd or cozy cottages with marsh and Folly River views. And for people who wouldn't dream of traveling without their four-legged companions, there are plenty of pet-friendly rentals too.

Where to Eat

You won't go hungry on this island. Fuel up for the day at Lost Dog Café, a local staple that serves coffee and all-day breakfast (so you can sleep in as long as you'd like). Don't miss their Lowcountry eggs Benedict, which they top with fried green tomatoes.

Fish tacos, Vietnamese-inspired lettuce wraps, and Cuban sandwiches all have a place on the colorful menu at Chico Feo, where the vibe is equally colorful. If you're in town for the wave-riding, be sure to check out their website's Surf Report, complete with a live video stream.

Don't let the easygoing atmosphere fool you: Rita's Seaside Grille is serious about its food...and its cocktails. Try one of the Signature Crushes, fruity sippers with flavored liquors that pack a punch.

End the night at Sand Dollar Social Club, a dive bar where you're invited to come as you are, so long as you're a member; membership costs $1, so bring your cash (you won't find a credit card machine here).

Though technically not on Folly (it's about two miles away), you'd be remiss to make a trip all this way without carving out time for a meal at family-owned Bowens Island Restaurant, a family-owned joint where the walls are graffitied and the oysters are locally harvested.

Where to Relax

The island's six miles of beachfront are its main attraction, and it'd be easy to while away a week with no plans beyond putting your toes in the sand. Spend a day shelling, sunning, surfing, or searching for shark teeth.

At the northern end of Folly Beach, the Morris Island Lighthouse provides a stunning backdrop from the shore. Get a closer look from the Lighthouse Inlet Heritage Preserve or via kayak. Several guided tours leave from Folly Beach to visit Morris Island for shelling, photography, and lighthouse history. The historic lighthouse is not open for viewing. How close you can get to the lighthouse depends on the tides.

Where to Play

Pack your fishing poles (or rent one) to test your fishing luck off the beloved Folly Beach Pier, which reopened in December 2022 after extensive renovations. If you're visiting in the summer, put on your dancing shoes—flip-flops count!—and head back to the Pier for one of the Moonlight Mixers, a music-filled family event held once monthly May through September.

For those looking to build an action-packed itinerary, there are plenty of activities that highlight the destination's natural beauty: Book a guided kayak tour with Charleston Outdoor Adventures, rent a stand-up paddleboard to explore the tidal creeks, or hop on a boat to discover uninhabited beachfront, where you can look for sharks' teeth and other fossils.

Stop by McKevlin's Surf Shop, South Carolina's oldest surfing outfitter, to peruse their selection of gear. You can also rent a surf or body board from the shop if you don't have one of your own; first-timers should consult their recommended list of surf instructors. Once you've got it down, catch some of the area's best waves at The Washout—or take a seat on the beach and see how the local pros do it.

Author Terry McDonell reminisces about a winter retreat at Folly Beach

South Carolina is famous for its beaches, but I didn’t know them. Folly Beach, which I discovered looking for escape from a dark, grueling New York City winter, advertised exceptional surf breaks and beach town tradition. Yeah, I thought, Folly Beach! Brilliant water, four-generation family beach houses, surfer subculture, and only one bridge on and off the island; my Southern friends were surprised I’d found it.I missed kicking off the new year with the “Bill Murray look-alike” polar bear plu...

South Carolina is famous for its beaches, but I didn’t know them. Folly Beach, which I discovered looking for escape from a dark, grueling New York City winter, advertised exceptional surf breaks and beach town tradition. Yeah, I thought, Folly Beach! Brilliant water, four-generation family beach houses, surfer subculture, and only one bridge on and off the island; my Southern friends were surprised I’d found it.

I missed kicking off the new year with the “Bill Murray look-alike” polar bear plunge, for which one dresses like a favorite Murray character and runs into the ocean. Motto: Freeze your balls off! No matter, I was just happy to find it was 20 degrees warmer than New York, and empty except for year-round people and diehard surfers. End to end, Folly is only six miles of wide beaches broken and protected by a series of jetties, and I planned to walk them all.

My rented house faced “The Washout,” a long beach break that got rowdy during storm swells and on windy days when the blow whipped up classic, rolling surf. A 20-minute walk up the beach was the Lighthouse Inlet Heritage Preserve with nesting sites for threatened loggerhead turtles. A local said you could find shark’s teeth there, but I never really looked. Off the beach, was marshland and maritime forest with stopover and winter roosting sites for flyway birds including the endangered piping plovers that I saw.

If I walked west, I would end up at Folly Beach County Park, acres of bone-white sand and scrub dunes bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the wide (at that point) Folly River. A day-tripper magnet between Memorial Day and Labor Day, it was now almost deserted except for people walking with dogs (only allowed in winter).

I had been warned about the weather, but on some of my best days the rain would come and go several times, leaving a freshness on the magnolias that perfumed the salt air coming off the water. My backyard had magnolias, too, and two stands of 60-foot palmetto palms with large fronds, as well as hemlocks with dense green umbrella tops— excellent nesting cover for the robins, mockingbirds, and woodpeckers that fed on the palmetto cones and seeds. A swinging back gate opened onto wetlands that rose and fell with the tide.

By the time my month was up, the lessons of Folly would stay with me in the specifics. The birds and the trees and the long beach walks, learning the tides, the endlessly changing rhythms of the Atlantic. The way the sun would rise over the wetlands just outside my back gate, where early one morning I saw a family of raccoons, perhaps heading for the preserve.

Driving north over the Folly River Bridge at the end of my month, I knew that hordes would descend all summer and surfers would complain it was too crowded just to go left. But those high-season inconveniences weren’t my concern. For a month in the middle of winter, Folly was the perfect beach.

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Terry McDonell is a media executive, literary editor, and published author. He has won numerous awards for his editorial work at various magazines and websites and has written and produced for film and television. Known for his acclaimed book The Accidental Life, McDonell returned to memoir with his most recent book, Irma: The Education of a Mother’s Son.

This article appears in the Winter 2023 issue of Southbound.

Folly Beach is unapologetically its authentic self

Folly Beach, the self-titled “Edge of America” greets you with an easy-going vibe that has a colorful hue of charming restaurants and souvenir shops. Palmetto trees gently shade the edges of Center Street. The town is widely regarded as South Carolina’s quintessential fun and funky beach community.With a population just over 2,000 people, this tight-knit town and surrounding area defines its unique essence with its laid-back demeanor and inclusive atmosphere.A notable transformation for Folly Beach has been th...

Folly Beach, the self-titled “Edge of America” greets you with an easy-going vibe that has a colorful hue of charming restaurants and souvenir shops. Palmetto trees gently shade the edges of Center Street. The town is widely regarded as South Carolina’s quintessential fun and funky beach community.

With a population just over 2,000 people, this tight-knit town and surrounding area defines its unique essence with its laid-back demeanor and inclusive atmosphere.

A notable transformation for Folly Beach has been the frequent reconstruction of its pier. In the 1960s, the pier emerged as a musical hub, attracting crowds from across the country who developed a fondness for the community, leading to its title as “the people’s beach.” Since then, Folly Beach has become a safe haven for surf enthusiasts and beach lovers alike.

The town’s inherent charm draws visitors from all over. But what truly anchors many locals is its reputation for offering some of the finest waves in Charleston, especially catering to beginners. Shane Granigan became the first employee of Isla Surf School in 2015, working alongside founder Peter Melhado to create a welcoming and secure, yet fun, atmosphere for learning to surf on Folly Beach.

“People who surf on Folly come from all different backgrounds,” Graingan said. “You get people riding their first waves, all the way to people who have been surfing their entire life and have based their life around it. So it’s a fun mix of people.”

What sets Folly apart from other beaches is that you can tailor your experience to exactly what you’re looking for, Graingan said. It’s spread out, which allows you to find a little nook or cranny for yourself or some friends. If you prefer, you can join a whole crowd to surf with.

“The community and the vibe out there is what really keeps people coming back,” he said. “It’s got a little bit of something for everyone. Whether it’s surfing and then going and grabbing a beer at Chico Feo, there’s always people around.”

Nadia Klincewicz and Liz Wolfe co-founded she’s on edge, a Charleston-based women’s surf and skate collection. They host meet-ups and events on Folly Beach, creating a space for women of all ages to thrive and receive support within the community.

Wolfe describes Folly as “a really magical place for women surfing.” When she isn’t surfing or arranging the next paddle, you can find her working at McKelvin’s Surf Shop, South Carolina’s longest-established surf shop.

Wolfe said she loves the dead of the winter when she can sit and catch up with locals who come into the shop. She says summer is crazy as hundreds of people come into the shop daily. During the colder months, it’s nice to have a moment to breathe.

“Driving down any given street on Folly is really representative of the kookiness of Folly,” she said. “Not one house is the same. You’ve got massive, built-up, four-story homes, and then you’ve got little beach shanties and everything in between. I feel like that is a good metaphor for the people on Folly.

“There’s no type of person, It’s just characters. Even when there is dysfunction, it is a family dysfunction — there’s still love there.”

Klincewicz lives on Folly and describes it as “a really dynamic place to live because it changes throughout the season, like being a snowbird but in your own home.”

During morning walks, she said she enjoys bumping into her neighbors and taking a moment to say, “Hey.”

“You just feel like you have such a strong support system,” she said. “If you ever need anything, there’s 12 neighbors that you can call and everyone will be jumping to help you.”

Locals often come together at locally owned bars, unique restaurants and watering holes where they unwind and socialize.

“People are a bit more down to have an experience that’s more authentic and a little less polished,” said Ian Condon, bar manager at Jack of Cups Saloon on Center Street.

Other parts of Charleston haven’t quite matched the innovative concept offered by Jack of Cups, which is praised for its fusion of global comfort food with influences from Asian and Indian cuisines. The interior is welcoming and cozy, with the perfect touch of quirkiness that seamlessly integrates with the authentic feel of Folly.

“I always laugh with people, we literally have a hole in our one wall at Jack of Cups,” Condon said. “It’s where the beer lines used to come in before they switched the bar around and we cover it with a sticker. Like, we’re literally a hole in the wall and people love that about us.”

Reflecting on his time working in the restaurant industry, he said he’s never encountered anyone like the local regulars who come in nearly everyday — the people who generously offer him parking in front of a house or use of an outdoor shower if he wishes to take a quick ocean dip before heading to work.

“Folly Beach doesn’t pretend to be anything other than itself. That kind of authenticity I think is one reason why the business thrives,” Condon said.

Folly Beach stands out as a cherished gem along the South Carolina coast. Whether it’s the vibrant community spirit or eccentric nature, locals and visitors find themselves drawn back time and again.

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Commentary: Many of us remember a different Folly Beach

Mr. John’s Beach Store has been a fixture on Folly Beach since 1951. The affectionately coined “mayor of Folly Beach,” Paul Chrysostom, took over the family business started by his parents, John and Rachel Chrysostom. They were esteemed, respected and beloved members of the community; John was a bookkeeper, accountant and Greek professor, and his wife, Rachel, a pharmacist.For many of us who recall the old days on Folly, Mr. John’s was the last stronghold of memories that can never be replaced. Mr. John’s...

Mr. John’s Beach Store has been a fixture on Folly Beach since 1951. The affectionately coined “mayor of Folly Beach,” Paul Chrysostom, took over the family business started by his parents, John and Rachel Chrysostom. They were esteemed, respected and beloved members of the community; John was a bookkeeper, accountant and Greek professor, and his wife, Rachel, a pharmacist.

For many of us who recall the old days on Folly, Mr. John’s was the last stronghold of memories that can never be replaced. Mr. John’s, which recently was sold, was the heart and soul of Center Street.

I recently read an article on the WCSC-TV website that quoted Folly Beach Mayor Tim Goodwin as saying: “When people come to me and say, ‘I want Folly Beach to be like it was,’ I look at them and say, ‘What do you remember Folly Beach being?’”

Given that Mayor Goodwin moved to Folly Beach in 1998, I would like to respectfully answer his question.

Folly Beach was a vibrant, magical, exciting, warm and lovable place. It was naturally community oriented. The sleepy beach. Some even called it the poor man’s beach.

But rest assured, there was nothing poor or wanting about Folly.

It was overflowing with riches, treasures that could never be measured materially. I don’t even remember the word tourist; everyone was welcomed and seen the same.

When I was growing up in the 1960s and ’70s, visiting Folly was like entering a portal into an enchanted world.

A horse that belonged to a neighbor was stabled in our backyard.

My grandfather gave the Bruggemann family next door our backyard garage to stable their horse, Nosy.

The family’s daughter, Nancy, in turn, gave me rides on Nosy on the beach. It was a young girl’s dream.

The boy next door was my first crush. It was a time of innocence and sweetness that can never be duplicated.

Cars could drive on the beach, horses pranced along the streets, and neighbors never locked their doors for the simple reason that our neighbors were not considered neighbors. They were family.

Folly wasn’t “funky.” It wasn’t branded. It wasn’t marketed. It was what it was.

The Sanitary Restaurant on Center Street had a lunch counter that sold soft-serve ice cream sundaes and the best sandwiches and comfort food.

The Pavilion had wooden benches, hotdogs and hamburgers, and the amusement rides twirled with the echo of children’s laughter in the air.

We used to walk an eternity over the big sand dunes to get to the beach.

Many times, we would swim in the gullies by the old groins even if folks were there crabbing.

My grandfather George Manos would go out in the wee hours of the morning with his big net and bring in buckets of fish for my grandmother Virginia to clean and cook.

The front porch was an open door that called to passersby: “Come on up. The table is full.”

Generosity and hospitality flowed like the ocean. And at night, we would be lulled to sleep by the sound of her waves.

Goodbye, Mr. John’s Beach Store.

You will always be in my heart. This is what Folly was like — in all her beauty, simplicity and wonder. A reminder that the greatest gifts of life are priceless.

Jackie Morfesis is a Charleston writer, speaker and community advocate.

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Army Corps of Engineers announces long-awaited Folly Beach renourishment project

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCIV) — The Folly Beach coastline is finally getting some much-needed relief after taking a beating from Mother Nature in 2023.Hurricanes, tropical storms and king tides all took their toll on the popular public beaches.Friday, the Army Corps of Engineers announced they will soon begin the much-anticipated beach renourishment project."You could go sit on with a slow tide, come back when it's high tide, you won't see that beach today," said Folly Beach Mayor Tim Goodwin.Erosion is...

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCIV) — The Folly Beach coastline is finally getting some much-needed relief after taking a beating from Mother Nature in 2023.

Hurricanes, tropical storms and king tides all took their toll on the popular public beaches.

Friday, the Army Corps of Engineers announced they will soon begin the much-anticipated beach renourishment project.

"You could go sit on with a slow tide, come back when it's high tide, you won't see that beach today," said Folly Beach Mayor Tim Goodwin.

Erosion is a never-ending problem on Folly Beach, which is why this project is so big.

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Army Corps of Engineers announces long-awaited Folly Beach renourishment project (WCIV)

Read more: "Folly Beach dodges severe damage, gears up for $18M renourishment project."

"We're looking to place about 1.2 million cubic yards of sand on the beach, and that's equivalent to about 120,000 dump trucks at a cost of around $18 million," said Wes Wilson, project manager with the Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston District.

"The contractor, depending on how much sand they need to place in each section, typically is in a 500-foot section between two and five days. So areas of the beach that are more eroded they typically spend more time in it," said Goodwin.

With the Army Corps of Engineers picking up the check, Folly Beach leaders can save their money.

"That leaves our beach reserve, but money intact, and we add to that every year. So, every year, we make sure that we have a reserve of money for the day when we have to pay our 15% or 10%," said Goodwin.

Read more: "Coastal damage assessment after heavy storms: Folly Beach experience mixed impact."

That reserve fund is often needed for smaller projects. Many times it's not just the big storms that are the issue.

"The hurricane that comes in and hangs offshore for a day or two and just beats and beats the beach and erodes it. Or Northeasterns that come in and hang around for a day or two that do the same thing, causing a lot of erosion. So this, this money we save this time is in the pot for repairing the beach of neck-to-neck storms or the storms after that," said Goodwin.

"Beach renourishment is a short-term inconvenience for a long-term benefit. And as we do add sand onto the beach, it provides that sense of security for the island for that next big storm," adds Wilson.

For a popular coastline that's suffered some of its worst damage since 2016, it's a welcome fix to get the beach back to normal.

"By building it back up, building the dunes up, extending the beach out, it gives us more area for people to come to enjoy the beach," said Goodwin.

The Army Corps must finish the Bird Cay project on Folly by March 15th. Soon after, they will begin work on the Folly beaches at large. That work will run from March until August.

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