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Mobile Oil Change in Russellville, SC

Here's a fact that most of us can agree on: Cars are getting more advanced with each passing day. Despite the emergence of technologies like self-driving cars, motor oil remains one of the most important elements of an internal combustion vehicle's makeup. You probably heard your parents preach about changing your car's oil frequently, and they were right. If you want to take care of your car, you've got to change its oil. Luckily, many modern cars include a built-in service reminder that notifies you when an oil change is necessary.

Even though your car's onboard computer can help with reminders, it's still a good idea to check oil levels often. The problem is that in today's day and age, lots of folks don't have the time or patience to change oil themselves. Ask yourself this: When was the last time lifted the hood of your car and checked your oil? What about your air filter and windshield wipers?

Between long workdays, impromptu meetings, family obligations, and life's little surprises, changing oil by yourself can be both difficult and frustrating. You know that your oil needs to be changed, but you just don't have the bandwidth to get it done. If that sounds familiar, it might be time for a mobile oil change in Russellville, SC.

Mobile oil change services allow you to focus on your busy life without having to get your hands dirty or wait in line for hours at the dealership. And when it comes to mobile oil changes in Russellville, none do it better than On the Go Mobile Oil Change Service.

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Drive Confidently with Help from On the Go Oil Change

When it comes to maintaining your car, you can trust our oil change experts to keep your vehicle running smoothly anywhere in Russellville. Our team comes to your location ASAP, whether it's a parking spot near your office or in your own driveway. Once we arrive, we will work hard and efficiently to quickly complete your mobile oil change in Russellville, SC.

After all, your time is valuable. That's why we come to you - so you don't have to wait in a crowded waiting room or somewhere else while we work on your car. With On the Go Oil Change, you can rest easy knowing your car or truck is in capable hands. That way, you can focus on what you need to accomplish rather than worrying about drip pans and oil filters.

Our process is easy and streamlined to make your life as easy as possible.

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Get Started
Get Started

When you're ready for mobile auto service, call us at 843-406-3466 to receive an estimate and reserve an appointment. You can also book your appointment via our website.

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Auto Service
Enjoy Quick & Easy Mobile Auto Service in Russellville, SC

Once you reserve your appointment time and date, we bring a wealth of auto experience directly to you. Our technicians show up on time with a smile, provide efficient and thorough auto services like oil changes, and let you go about your day.

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Automobile
Drive your Automobile with Confidence!

Once we've completed your auto services, it's time to get back on the road with confidence knowing that On the Go Mobile Oil Change took great care of you and your car.

On the Go Oil Change Services

Depending on your needs, we can help assist with a variety of mobile auto services in Russellville, SC, including the following:

Standard Oil Change

This package includes a full synthetic oil change and filter change.

Time: 30 Mins

Cost: $79.99

Includes 5 quarts of oil. Additional quarts are billed at $10 per quart.

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Silver

This package includes a full synthetic oil change, filter change, and windshield wiper replacement.

Time: 45 Mins

Cost: $109.99

Includes 5 quarts of oil. Additional quarts are billed at $10 per quart.

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Gold

This package includes a full synthetic oil change, filter change, air cabin filter change, and windshield wiper replacement.

Time: 45 Mins

Cost: $129.99

Includes 5 quarts of oil. Additional quarts are billed at $10 per quart.

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Platinum

This package includes a full synthetic oil change, filter change, air filter replacement, cabin filter replacement, and windshield wiper replacement.

Time: 45 Mins

Cost: $149.99

Includes 5 quarts of oil. Additional quarts are billed at $10 per quart.

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Want to learn more about mobile oil changes or the other auto services offered by On the Go Oil Change Service? Contact our office or leave us a message on our website. We'd love to hear from you!

Top 5 Signs Your Car Needs a Mobile Oil Change in Russellville, SC

Is your vehicle trying to tell you that it needs some attention? One of the ways it communicates with you is through signs indicating that it's time for an oil change. Ignoring these signals can lead to unwanted - and very expensive - consequences. Let's take a closer look at the most common signs that your car needs fresh oil and why neglecting this crucial task can be a costly mistake.

Is a Mobile Oil Change Really Necessary? Top Reasons to Change Your Oil Regularly

As we mentioned earlier, it's easy to put off car maintenance. If you're like most folks living in Russellville, you've got a busy 9-5 job and other obligations to accomplish every day. But if there's one thing you should try and keep up with, it's vehicle maintenance. And when it comes to maintenance, one of the most important areas to focus on is your engine's oil.

The oil in your engine is responsible for reducing friction and heat by lubricating moving parts. Fresh oil lubricates at its peak efficiency, which in turn minimizes the wear and tear on your engine components. Without a mobile oil change in Russellville, SC, your engine's cylinder bores can wear out significantly faster. While it may be hard to notice on the camshafts, over time, this increased wear can create a significant loss in power.

But that's just the start. Keep the following issues in mind next time you feel like putting off an oil change.

Overheated Engine

Oil not only lubricates engine parts but also helps in cooling them down. Even regular cars have specific designs to reduce oil temperature, while race cars have dedicated oil coolers. However, surpassing oil change intervals can lead to a reduction in oil-based cooling, causing increased friction and excessive heat. When heat levels are too high, your engine can overheat, leading to even more problems.

Debris Becomes Lodged in Mechanical Systems

Many complex mechanical systems require proper oil flow to function properly, such as variable valve timing, engine breathers, and turbochargers. Variable valve timing systems rely on the oil pressure of the engine to operate with precision.

Even a slight decrease in oil pressure, quality, or viscosity can adversely affect these systems. In the best-case scenario, the engine stops varying the valve timing properly. In the worst-case scenario, the variable valve timing system gets clogged, and it needs to be removed, replaced, or cleaned.

Loss of Performance

If you're used to skipping oil changes, you may have noticed the difference between how your car performs after having its oil changed. Fresh, new oil keeps the spinning parts of your engine running smoothly. When those parts run smoothly, your car doesn't have to use as much power to make revolutions. That, in turn, bumps up performance levels.

Voided Warranty

Did you know that the manufacturer's warranty for a new car can last up to ten years, but only if you follow the recommended maintenance schedule? If you miss too many oil changes, for example, the warranty terms could be declared void. If you ever need major repairs on your car, it could end up costing you thousands of dollars more than it would have if the warranty was still valid.

Having On the Go Mobile Oil Change service your car is one of the best ways to avoid unexpected - and more expensive - repairs.

Poor Fuel Economy

Earlier in this article, we mentioned how decreased fuel economy could be a sign that you need your oil changed. It's also a symptom of infrequent oil changes. Failing to change your engine oil on time can lead to an increase in your fuel consumption. This is primarily caused by the increase in heat, reduction in compression due to worn cylinders, and lack of cooling, which ultimately results in lower fuel efficiency.

In the long run, this increase in fuel consumption can significantly raise gas costs, which end up being more expensive than mobile auto services in Russellville, SC.

Failed Turbos and Destroyed Engines

Turbochargers are widely used in modern cars to increase their power and efficiency by utilizing waste energy from the exhaust. They are responsible for the popularity of small, high MPG-achieving engines found in many popular auto brands.

Turbos spin at incredibly fast speeds, exceeding 10,000 RPM, and require a substantial supply of oil to operate efficiently. Any pause or disruption in the oil supply can cause the turbine to overheat and fail. Since half of the turbo is in the path of the air entering the engine, in the event of a catastrophic failure, shards of the turbine can break off and enter the engine, resulting in severe damage.

Reduced Sale Price of Your Car

Most new car owners don't think of the resale value of their new vehicle as they're driving it off the lot. That doesn't change the fact that you may decide to sell or trade it in for a new vehicle down the road. If that happens, make sure you get your oil changed regularly.

By following a regular schedule of oil changes, you can increase the resale value of your car. This is because the engine will perform noticeably better during an inspection or test drive. It's important to keep a detailed record of all maintenance, including oil changes, as this can further improve your sale price.

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At this point, you may be wondering how many miles you should wait before having a mobile oil change. As a general rule, it's a good idea to have your oil changed every three thousand miles. However, some newer model cars only require an oil change every 7,500 miles. The bottom line is that every car is different. It's best to refer to your vehicle's owner's manual for detailed information on oil changes.

 Oil Change While At Home Russellville, SC

Enjoy Peace of Mind and Better Performance with a Mobile Oil Change in Russellville, SC

At this point, you may be wondering how many miles you should wait before having a mobile oil change. As a general rule, it's a good idea to have your oil changed every three thousand miles. However, some newer model cars only require an oil change every 7,500 miles. The bottom line is that every car is different. It's best to refer to your vehicle's owner's manual for detailed information on oil changes.

We take pride in using quality oils and filters and provide a variety of extra services, such as auto filter changes and wiper blade replacements. By keeping our mobile oil change services reasonably priced, we can help ensure they get the best possible value for their money.

Whether you need us to change your oil at your house, your office, or somewhere else, we've got you covered. If you own a business that requires company vehicles, we can even service your fleet of cars or trucks. Contact our office today to schedule your mobile oil change or to learn more about our mobile auto services in Russellville.

Mobile Oil Change Russellville, SC

Latest News in Russellville, SC

Rees tosses complete-game victory as SC baseball beats Russellville on Senior Night

MOKANE -- South Callaway baseball senior Owen Rees, an all-state catcher, tossed a complete-game victory, scored two runs and drove in one on Senior/Youth Appreciation Night Wednesday at South Callaway's baseball field."It's been a long year, and I've had games where I've thrown hard, games where I've thrown soft," Rees said. "This is one of the games I was not throwing my best; I just had to spot up and keep it away from the middle of the plate and let my infielders do the work. It's been a long, long season with them....

MOKANE -- South Callaway baseball senior Owen Rees, an all-state catcher, tossed a complete-game victory, scored two runs and drove in one on Senior/Youth Appreciation Night Wednesday at South Callaway's baseball field.

"It's been a long year, and I've had games where I've thrown hard, games where I've thrown soft," Rees said. "This is one of the games I was not throwing my best; I just had to spot up and keep it away from the middle of the plate and let my infielders do the work. It's been a long, long season with them. Some days, they've had really good games back behind me, and I trust them. Some days, it's kind of hard to, but I have complete trust in them right now going into districts. It's been a lot of fun. Behind the plate, hitting, I went through a slump there for a little while, and I came in today and just put everything out of my mind and swung the bat."

Snapping their three-game losing streak in the Show-Me Conference, the Bulldogs cruised to a 10-1 victory against the Russellville Indians.

Coming off a 7-4 defeat to Eugene Monday, where it plated three of its runs in the first two innings, South Callaway (11-13, 2-3 Show-Me) knew it needed to score more throughout the game.

The Bulldogs did that Wednesday, tallying two runs in the first inning, two in the second, two in the fourth, one in the fifth and three in the sixth, as they notched 10 hits.

"We were able to work into hitters' counts at the plate, getting into 2-1 counts, 1-0, 3-1 and then find the pitch we can be aggressive on," South Callaway baseball coach Mason Mershon said. "A lot of them did that today, one through nine."

In addition, Rees (3-2) allowed just four hits while striking out five, walking two, and hitting one batter. He threw 94 pitches (63 strikes) and faced 29 batters.

"He's had multiple successful starts for us on the mound, which is something that he hasn't really done in his time here up until this year," Mershon said. "He's really helped us out tremendously, and I couldn't be more proud of him, especially to do something like that on Senior Night. To go the distance for the team on the mound was awesome for him."

Ethan Edwards, who hit a double down the left-field line with two outs in the bottom of the first for South Callaway's first hit, scored the Bulldogs' first run when ensuing batter Rees reached second base on a throwing error to first base by Russellville's second baseman.

Rees scored in the next at-bat, swiping third base and heading home after the Indians' catcher overthrew his third baseman. That was South Callaway's final run of the first inning, as it held a 2-0 advantage.

An inning later, another Bulldogs senior excelled, with Jacob Boese grounding an RBI single to the shortstop. Registering its second run of the second inning, Dane Daugherty scored when Edwards snapped his bat and reached first base on a fielding error by Russellville's shortstop.

It remained 4-0 South Callaway until the top of the fourth when Russellville (6-18, 1-4 Show-Me) scored its lone run on Maddox Plate's RBI single to right field.

During the next frame, Edwards, using a different bat, increased the Bulldogs' lead to 6-1 when he slapped a two-RBI single up the middle.

Keeping its foot on the pedal, South Callaway went ahead 7-1 when Chase Mealy lined an RBI single to left field in the fifth inning.

A run short of earning a six-inning run-rule victory, the Bulldogs plated three runs on two hits and walks and a hit by pitch in the bottom of the sixth. Rees sent across South Callaway's first run of the inning on his sacrifice fly to center field, and three batters later, Graden Pontius smacked a two-RBI single through the second baseman's glove into right-center field.

Edwards and Boese each hit a double for the Bulldogs' two extra-base hits. Daugherty scored a game-high three runs and swiped a game-high two bases; South Callaway tallied five stolen bases.

Russellville starter Ethan Hickey took the loss, giving up four runs (one earned) on four hits and one walk while striking out one in two innings.

Before the game, South Callaway held its Senior Night ceremony for seniors Boese, Daugherty, Rees and Kaidon Gideon.

"Well, it's not easy for a senior player to come in and have a new coach to play for their senior year," Mershon said. "I'm really impressed by the way they've handled and been flexible with some of the new styles and new things that a new coach brings. I've really been grateful and blessed to have had the opportunity to coach these four and I hopefully can keep coaching them for several more weeks."

After beating the Indians, the Bulldogs' four seniors shared their experience with South Callaway and discussed their future beyond high school.

Boese shared why last season's Class 3 state runner-up finish was memorable to him.

"It was definitely just all of last year," Boese said of what was memorable about his time on South Callaway baseball. "It was just a fun experience with everybody, and especially going all the way that was awesome. I definitely won't ever forget it."

Following high school, Boese will go to technical school.

"In July, I started a state technical school in Nevada (Missouri), MWI," Boese said. "I'm gonna go weld."

Daugherty explained how the postgame meals have been one of his favorite memories while playing for the Bulldogs.

"I know it sounds boring, but going to eat (at Jalisco in Fulton) after games with the boys," Daugherty said. "That was always my favorite time. Obviously, it is great to get wins with all your friends and stuff, but yeah, just having that time outside of baseball.

Daugherty will attend the State Technical College of Missouri in Linn for the next two years before likely working at the Callaway Plant and doing nuclear operations.

"I'm really thankful for all my coaches and everyone that supported me," Daugherty said.

Gideon decided to play baseball in his final year at South Callaway and was happy with his decision.

"It was my senior year, and I've had a lot of regrets," Gideon said. "I was gonna play football earlier this year, and there's stuff going on in my personal life that prevented me from doing that. But looking back, I wish I had joined. I just didn't want to make the same mistake with baseball again. So, I decided to just stick it and do it, and I'm really happy that I did."

Looking back at his first year of baseball, Gideon explained what it's been like.

"I remember the first practice I came to; that was really awesome," Gideon said. "I remember my arm being sore. That was the big thing. But, there's been a ton of moments over the season where I've been really glad that I joined. Even though I haven't played in a while, I'm grateful for everything. All the memories I've made since I've been here for the last three months, I can't really name any specific moment because there's just been so much happening that I've been really enjoying every lesson."

Like Daugherty, Gideon plans to attend the State Technical College of Missouri.

"I plan on going to state tech for nuclear tech operations, and in the fall, looking to be a nuclear tech operator," Gideon said. "Nothing too much other than that, hopefully get my life on a good track, trying to prepare."

Last but not least, Rees, a key member of last season's state runner-up team and a three-sport athlete at South Callaway, reflected on what moment with the Bulldogs was most memorable.

"One of the best times that I've had was at the Borgia tournament at the beginning of the season," Rees said. "That's always fun whether we go out there and win or get our butts kicked. It's always fun to go out there and spend a weekend with just your teammates and go to the pool and just relax in each other's rooms and then just get up and play some ball in the morning. So, it's a pretty memorable moment."

Rees also bonded with his teammates and Fulton's team when South Callaway played state baseball in Ozark last spring.

"We went to Lambert's, and that was probably one of the best times I've had eating ever," Rees said. "It was just an all-out battle. We (South Callaway and Fulton) were in back-to-back tables. Let's just say there were rolls thrown at one another in that moment."

Being a multi-sport athlete can be challenging, but managing two in one season is even more so. Rees did that during his final two years at South Callaway with baseball and boys track and field.

"I've gone to a lot more (track and field) meets this year," Rees said. "It's a little bit more lenient this year than it was last year. New coach coming in, he let us do a little bit more than we did last year with coach (Heath) Lepper. But it's been nice to get away from baseball for a minute and relax out there on the track side of things. That's been a great and wonderful experience to get out and do something different that I don't do every day."

Upon graduation, Rees plans to join the military.

"Probably about two months ago, I went up...and got everything checked out and I was perfectly good," Rees said. "So, I went in, and I signed on to the Navy as a CB (construction battalion), and then my contract is for five years active and three years in the reserves. I'll be a construction mechanic for the CBs. So, working on all heavy equipment."

South Callaway honored its most experienced players and displayed its future when youth Bulldogs joined the host's starting nine on the field for the national anthem.

"We had a youth baseball camp back in the fall," Mershon said. "A lot of those kids were a part of and just kind of get associated with those youth kids, start building the relationships early with them is so important. And, a big, big piece of my coaching philosophy."

From here on out, it's the business end of the season for South Callaway. Its next game is against Show-Me/district opponent New Bloomfield (10-7, 2-3 Show-Me) at 5 p.m. Friday at Rod Haley Field in New Bloomfield. The Bulldogs are seeking their seventh straight victory against their in-county rival.

"We'll know our district seeds before Friday (district seeding meeting is today), but New Bloomfield has a rich, rich history in baseball and having success," Mershon said. "They're well coached by coach (Justin) Forsythe over there does a really good job and hope we can go there and compete and kick off the weekend with a win."

Looking back at the Camp Manufacturing Company and Russellville

This is contradicted by one family member, who says it was Theodore Russell, a cousin of W. P. Russell, who was the founder. Regardless, we’re telling the story of John M. Camp, Jr., who came to the area in 1922, where he found W.P. Russell operating a ground mill beside his cotton gin five miles west of St. Stephen. Camp bought part of Russell's farm and built his mill a half mile to the north of Russell's store, which had served as a post office since 1916.For newcomers to Berkeley County, Russellville is located on what used ...

This is contradicted by one family member, who says it was Theodore Russell, a cousin of W. P. Russell, who was the founder. Regardless, we’re telling the story of John M. Camp, Jr., who came to the area in 1922, where he found W.P. Russell operating a ground mill beside his cotton gin five miles west of St. Stephen. Camp bought part of Russell's farm and built his mill a half mile to the north of Russell's store, which had served as a post office since 1916.

For newcomers to Berkeley County, Russellville is located on what used to be the old Murray’s Ferry Road (modern day S.C. Highway 35) going north, approximately five miles from Bonneau, toward Santee River.

In his autobiography, John (Jack) Madison Camp, Jr. tells us about his family and their lumber mill village history located in Russellville. “We moved to Franklin, Virginia in 1921, but we soon moved again. We went to the St. Stephen area of South Carolina, where Daddy had been assigned the task of building a new mill and mill village. These itinerant sawmill communities had a motto, "Cut Out and Get Out." There was no reforesting program and no cry for it at that time.”

When the Camp’s moved into a new location that had a good stand of timber, they would keep cutting for some time, as was the case in the Santee area of South Carolina. The mill made a huge difference in the area, for sure, providing employment and a great economical boost. The plan was to work there for maybe fifteen to twenty-five years. The company laid down a center street, then set up a water tower that could be used for potable water uses and to supply the village that was soon to be built.

“They left room on the center street for the schoolhouse that my father built for the employee's children. The Russellville community didn't have a school in that area of Berkeley County at that time. Teachers were imported, much to the glee of all the single men in that area.”

Camp says it seemed to him that St. Stephen's main reason for being was that the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad came through there. And that was of course true, but not the main reason. Church and religion were of utmost importance in early colonial time, so the "old brick church" was actually the primary reason for St. Stephen's existence, and how the town got its name.

Just north, maybe a mile, of the little village of Russellville, made up entirely of Camp’s employees, was found a community club, a Parent-Teacher association, a home demonstration club, a two-story school building (see photo) in which two teachers (one of which was my Grandmother) taught and trained the young folks, and where on Sundays the auditorium served as a church and Sunday-School room, a two story hotel that would have been a credit to a much larger town, and twenty-two cottages, actually, they were homes for the employees, painted (!), and each with front and back yards that had been beautified.

Each year a civic contest was sponsored by Camp Manufacturing among its homemakers. A first prize of five dollars and a second of two-fifty were offered “to the one making the most improvements in the home grounds or to the one keeping the grounds most satisfactory.” Consequently, each yard turned out to be a bit of a garden, where kids romped and played, while their mothers sat on their screened porches (usually shelling peas and beans during summer months), passing away each day, pleasantly visiting one with the other of their neighbors.

Each home was screened and equipped with modern conveniences of lights and water, and practically each boasted a radio, and many with automobiles. The mill village of Camp had an electric system that drew its power from the company generator. Odd to us today, was the fact that at 9 o'clock P.M. the lights would blink once. At 9:05 they would blink twice, and at 9:15, all the current would go off until the next morning about daylight. Reason being, simply, the generators had to be shut down to maintain them.

The Camp family had lived in Virginia since before the American Revolution. The lumber business was started by P.D. Camp in Franklin in 1870. He later took into the firm his brother, R.J. Camp and J.L. Camp, and organized the Camp Manufacturing Company. All of the original members of the firm have passed on, and company tasks left to their sons.

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Most likely, an important explanation of Camp’s success in business was its tenet that it is just as important to develop men as it is to manufacture lumber products. The heads of this firm always maintained that character building is superior to anything else.

Respect for the Sabbath was one of their policies that “must be held inviolate.” The story is told that when the Camps began their endeavor in the lumber business, the company had rented a tug to pull the logs up the river (this was in Virginia). The owners of the tug explained that they operated on a seven-day a week basis, and that is what they charged for. Camp replied that he understood this, and he expected to pay for seven days’ usage . . . but, he also intended to tie up the tug at 12 o’clock Saturday nights, where it would remain until 12 o’clock Sunday nights. Thus, after six-days a week, his plants, over those many years became silent on Sunday. (The only exception to this rule was boiler maintenance.)

Camp Jr. said at times his father would allow one of his hometown friends to come and visit him, and this was always a great and exciting occasion for both. They would stay in the men's dormitory on the upper floor of the company store building (see photo). This was a big wooden building (I don’t remember if it was painted), covered in tongue and grooved siding (we call it "bead-board" now) that was made in the mill. The men's dormitory consisted of several rooms and a big common shower and bathroom for the visiting men. The more permanent employees took up residence there in very modest rooms. Less permanent residents stayed over at Mrs. Nixon's Boarding House that was only a few hundred yards away. There was some heat from individual wood fed heaters in the company storerooms, but there was certainly no air-conditioning.

The Company Store was a big two-story building, with three chimneys. Any of life’s supplies you needed were available. A major part of the first floor was a large porch out front. It was covered, not screened, and there were benches around the porch for people to sit while waiting to go into the store, or just to enjoy some community life.

Camp's company store had a problem (as all general stores did), rats. Rice, flour, cornmeal, seed, etc., were being stored for use and sale. Cats were used from time to time, but probably were intimidated by the size of some of the rats. So, the company decided to use ferrets to keep the rats under control. They were slender, quick, and very aggressive. The ferrets had beautiful fur but were not very friendly. They would bite a person as quickly as they'd bite a rat. Nevertheless, they were necessary, and they seemed to keep the rats under control.

Camp’s homes (“quarters” to the locals) were close to the company store and arranged so that the houses faced each other across the main street. There was a rumor going around Russellville that all the children born on one side of that street were boys and all those born on the other side were girls. If a couple wanted to change the sex of the next child, they would just move over to the other side of the street. Oddly enough, that seemed to work for a long period of time.

The schoolhouse (see photo) and the boarding house were located at opposite ends of the street. Mrs. Nixon, the lady who ran the boarding house in St. Stephen, was a good manager. She furnished lots of good, very plain food to many hungry millworkers. Mill workers with no family could dine at the boarding house and be adequately nourished. Jack Camp, Jr. says "Mrs. Nixon also had an attractive daughter whose name was Elsie, who became fast friends with my older sister Virginia." Teachers were allowed to have meals at the boarding house, offering variety, and a change of conversation for the men there.

Camp’s boarding house cook was Joe Poseskie, and Jack remembers Joe cooking frog legs. A lot of people ate frog legs, but they were sort of dangerous to cook, because reflex action left in the dead limbs caused the legs to kick the grease out. That often burned the cook, and needless to say, Joe didn't like that.

The health of the Camp village was insured by company physician, Dr. Carroll, also the community doctor when I was young. Located between the white mill workers' quarters and the black's quarters that were located farther down the same street, the doctor's office was approximately 200 feet from the company store. Many of the medical problems originated from emergencies at the mill, so he would go right into the place where there had been an accident and treat the patient there. Then he would take them to Moncks Corner to Berkeley County Hospital, or Charleston, depending on the care required for them. It wasn't until the mid-fifties that Dr. Sam O. Schumann came to Camp village to practice medicine.

Camp Manufacturing Company in Russellville became Russellville Lumber Company, owned by Williams Furniture Company, then Southern Coatings and Chemicals in Sumter, S.C. In the middle 1960’s, Georgia-Pacific Corporation bought the Russellville Lumber Company property and began establishing the complex consisting of a plywood plant, chip-n-saw plant, particleboard plant, chemical plant, and forestry division . . . all at Russellville, South Carolina, employing 500+ people.

Resources: From his book While You're Up, A Memoir, by John M. Camp, Jr., Charleston News and Courier, and personal remembrances. — Keith Gourdin

Berkeley County Receives $500,000 Grant to Fund Revitalization in St. Stephen Area

MONCKS CORNER, S.C. – (Thursday, September 15, 2022) – At its meeting on Monday, September 12, 2022, Berkeley County Council approved a $500,000 EPA Brownfields Assessment grant to help fund a large-scale revitalization initiative to greatly improve quality of life opportunities in the St. Stephen/Russellville area. Watch the full Council meeting HERE.This grant, part of the U.S. Env...

MONCKS CORNER, S.C. – (Thursday, September 15, 2022) – At its meeting on Monday, September 12, 2022, Berkeley County Council approved a $500,000 EPA Brownfields Assessment grant to help fund a large-scale revitalization initiative to greatly improve quality of life opportunities in the St. Stephen/Russellville area. Watch the full Council meeting HERE.

This grant, part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Brownfields Community Wide Assessment Grant Program, will help fund environmental assessments on properties located within a certain designated Census Tract in the St. Stephen area. With the help of community and residential input, the Town of St. Stephen—together with the EPA and Berkeley County Economic Development—will conduct up to 15 site inventories of brownfield sites, in the St. Stephen area, that could be redeveloped to provide more job opportunities and other quality of life resources for the community.

The grant has already identified two such sites: the former St. Stephen High School, which closed in 1996, and the area’s former Lumber Mill, which operated as a steam-powered lumber mill from the 1930s to mid-1960s and closed around 1970. Another goal of this large-scale initiative will be to develop a complete revitalization plan unique to St. Stephen.

Public meetings and community engagement will be critical throughout this process. More information on public meetings will be forthcoming.

“County Council is committed to improving access to resources and employment opportunities for people throughout Berkeley County. This grant will not only help fund these initiatives, but also ensure the St. Stephen community is involved in the process. Berkeley County’s success is directly related to the success of its citizens; inviting the public to the table on critical decision-making efforts like this one are what makes us #OneBerkeley.” -Johnny Cribb, Berkeley County Supervisor

“The town of St. Stephen is grateful that the EPA selected us to receive one of the 2022 Brownfields Program Grants for $500,000. We were the only municipality in Berkeley County to receive this. In countless other communities around the United States, the EPA’s Brownfield Program has had a proven track record of leveraging private sector investment, creating jobs, and protecting the environment. St. Stephen will use this Brownfields Grant to spur our town with redevelopment and cleanup projects and bring sustained economic growth. We are thankful for the support of the Berkeley County Economic Development Office and their ability to work with myself, Town Council, and the Town’s administration to write the grant proposal. We are ready to collaborate with the various committees that will be comprised of St. Stephen residents and business owners to help us continue to grow and revitalize our town. It has been well worth the wait. This is the first of many blessings in store for our great town.” -John Rivers, St. Stephen Mayor

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-Prepared by the Berkeley County Public Information Office-

ATU Graduates Reflect on an Achievement of a Lifetime

Brisa Hernandez-Cervantes did not hesitate when asked what motivated her to complete her degree and reach her graduation day at Arkansas Tech University.“It was my parents,” said Hernandez-Cervantes. “They immigrated here very young and became citizens. I knew if they could make something of themselves here, so could I. My dad is also a student here at Arkansas Tech, and that motivated me to keep pushing, keep studying and be the best I could be.”Hernandez-Cervantes was among approximately 1,050 students...

Brisa Hernandez-Cervantes did not hesitate when asked what motivated her to complete her degree and reach her graduation day at Arkansas Tech University.

“It was my parents,” said Hernandez-Cervantes. “They immigrated here very young and became citizens. I knew if they could make something of themselves here, so could I. My dad is also a student here at Arkansas Tech, and that motivated me to keep pushing, keep studying and be the best I could be.”

Hernandez-Cervantes was among approximately 1,050 students who earned degrees and certificates from ATU at the conclusion of the spring 2024 semester. Those graduates were celebrated over a span of four ceremonies on Friday, May 10, and Saturday, May 11, at Tucker Coliseum in Russellville.

A native of Russellville, Hernandez-Cervantes graduated from ATU with a Bachelor of Science degree in biochemistry and a certification in Spanish medical interpretation.

Her involvement beyond the classroom included membership in the Latin Student Organization, which she served as secretary and vice president.

“I was part of a community here at Tech,” said Hernandez-Cervantes. “Being in the Latin Student Organization led me to be a freshman orientation leader. I loved it. It pushed me out of my comfort zone and encouraged me to pursue my dreams. I am going to pharmacy school, and I feel like the Latin Student Organization helped me move forward toward that.”

Taurino Keeny of Sherwood is moving forward to a career in the U.S. Army. He was among six ATU graduates commissioned as second lieutenants during a commencement Saturday ceremony.

As a quartermaster officer in the U.S. Army, Keeny will be involved in the logistics of moving equipment and ensuring that soldiers have what they need to perform their roles.

“It’s all about the people,” said Keeny. “The line of work I’ll be going into, leading soldiers, I’d like to be able to lead them to the best of my abilities.”

It was the choral music program that originally brought Keeny to Arkansas Tech. As he went through his academic progression, Keeny changed his major from vocal music education to mathematics and then to sociology. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree.

Keeny appreciates that ATU’s size afforded him the opportunity to build relationships with his faculty members.

“You can actually get to know your professors and pick their brain,” said Keeny.

Faculty relationships were also a big part of Matthew Rivera’s ATU experience after he transferred to Arkansas Tech from Presbyterian College (S.C).

“It was kind of a culture shock being from Florida, going to South Carolina and then coming here,” said Rivera, who is originally from Jacksonville, Fla. “There is a lot more Southern hospitality here. My faculty members made me feel more like a friend than a student. They are great mentors and it was a great relationship, overall.”

Rivera credits his family supporting him from back home in Florida and the relationships he developed through his local church in Russellville in keeping him going during challenging times.

He also found strength through the leadership opportunities provided to him through the ATU football program.

“Being a leader in the receiver room helped me a lot,” said Rivera. “I was able to take freshmen under my wing and help them grow as best they could.”

Rivera will invest his final season of football eligibility at Anderson University (S.C.) while beginning work on his master’s degree in fall 2024.

Ashley Jones of Onia chose ATU because of the flexibility provided by distance learning.

“I wanted to get my degree online, and Arkansas Tech was the only college I called that gave me the opportunity to do my full English degree online,” said Jones. “The teachers can only do so much. If you’re not determined to read the material, you can’t pass.”

A mother of three, Jones hopes to utilize her degree from ATU in a teaching career at the K-12 middle or secondary level.

“I wanted to succeed and show my kids that you can,” said Jones. “There were more than a few of those moments when I was just done. We pulled through. I just wanted to succeed, get done and be a teacher. College is not harder than parenting. If you have done that, you can get a degree.”

Devon DesCarpentrie of Bryant selected Arkansas Tech based upon scholarships, affordability and the fact that the campus was right-sized for his preferences.

He succeeded at ATU because he found a home in the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree program.

“I like looking at the insides of how things work…the inner workings of machines and things like that,” said DesCarpentrie. “That really interests me. This program helped me break down a problem into its core components. That way, I can look at each individual part and be able to solve that rather than becoming overwhelmed by the whole picture.”

DesCarpentrie also completed the University Honors program at ATU.

“It definitely gave me a more holistic view of the world,” said DesCarpentrie when asked about University Honors at ATU. “It gave me new experiences I wouldn’t have had in mechanical engineering. I really enjoyed those classes a lot.”

That’s not to say it was always easy for the members of the ATU Class of 2024. Many of them arrived on campus during a pandemic. They overcame that, the re-adjustment period that followed and found the motivation necessary to cross the finish line.

“I didn’t want to disappoint myself,” said DesCarpentrie. “I tried to find that self-motivation and work toward something I’ve been wanting to do for a while.”

JW Aluminum’s Russellville, Arkansas, plant obtains GreenCircle certification

JW Aluminum, headquartered in Charleston, South Carolina, says its Russellville, Arkansas, aluminum rolled products facility is the first to achieve GreenCircle Certified LLC’s Certified Environmental Facts multiattribute certification. Specific to the alloys currently produced at JW Aluminum’s Russellville plant, the Certified Environmental Facts labels from Royersford, Pennsylvania-based GreenCircle provide environmental data, including recycled content composition, carbon footprint and energy reduction and waste diversion....

JW Aluminum, headquartered in Charleston, South Carolina, says its Russellville, Arkansas, aluminum rolled products facility is the first to achieve GreenCircle Certified LLC’s Certified Environmental Facts multiattribute certification. Specific to the alloys currently produced at JW Aluminum’s Russellville plant, the Certified Environmental Facts labels from Royersford, Pennsylvania-based GreenCircle provide environmental data, including recycled content composition, carbon footprint and energy reduction and waste diversion.

GreenCircle is a third-party certification company that offers an evaluation process designed to provide independent verification that sustainability claims related to an organization’s products and operations are honest, valid and verified. GreenCircle is ISO 17065 compliant, following industry requirements for bodies certifying products, processes and services. The company’s Certified Environmental Facts label is recognized by the U.S. Federal Government as a recommended Ecolabel for all federal purchasing. It also is recognized by the United States Green Building Council, the International Living Future Institute and the Association of Plastic Recyclers as a valid third-party certification entity.

JW Aluminum says it partnered with GreenCircle earlier this year to conduct months-long internal and external data verification audits, including on-site inspections with a supplier and at the JW Aluminum Russellville plant. The resulting certifications display substantiated environmental data in the form similar to a nutrition label, the company says, giving customers an efficient tool to understand and evaluate JW Aluminum’s environmental status and progress.

“Sustainability is elemental to what we do—the aluminum we produce is 100 percent recyclable,” Ryan Roush, chief commercial officer at JW Aluminum, says. “Obtaining these unique, user-friendly Certified Environmental Facts labels from GreenCircle is a natural extension of our commitment to monitoring and reducing our environmental impact and being transparent with our customer base.”

Roush adds, “Our Russellville location has been supplying high-quality aluminum rolled products for nearly two decades and remains core to our overall market and sustainability objectives. We’ve demonstrated and plan to amplify the ability to work together throughout the value chain to contribute to a more circular economy. It’s our shared mission to secure a safe, sustainable and successful future for generations to come.”

“We commend JW Aluminum for achieving GreenCircle Certified Environmental Facts labels for their aluminum rolled products,” says Tad Radzinski, certification officer at GreenCircle. “The Certified Environmental Facts label was developed by GreenCircle in 2014 and is the only multiattribute label that displays information like a nutrition label while also confirming that every attribute is third-party verified. GreenCircle’s Certified Environmental Facts label can also help earn LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) v4 & v4.1 credits. Obtaining GreenCircle’s Certified Environmental Facts label is not easy and demonstrates JW Aluminum’s commitment to transparency and to being a brand their customers can trust.”

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